Program » Speakers

Plenary Speakers

NANOPHOTONIC LAB-ON-A-CHIP SYSTEMS FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS
Hatice Altug
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), SWITZERLAND
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Emerging healthcare needs and initiatives are demanding breakthrough advancements in diagnostic and bioanalytical tools. Towards this goal, our lab is developing next-generation nanophotonic lab-on-a-chip systems offering high performance in precision, response time, integration, throughput portability and affordability. This talk will presentsome of our recent works such as an AI-aided optofluidic mid-infrared sensor capable of differentiating misfolded forms of disease proteins, nanophotonic single-cell microarrays that can enable high-throughput spatiotemporal monitoring of extracellular secretion and biosensing approaches for long-term continuous monitoring of biomolecules.



TOOLS TO ANALYZE VERY FEW, AND VERY MANY MOLECULES
Ulf Landegren
Uppsala Universitet, SWEDEN

BUILDING VASCULARIZED KIDNEY TISSUES FOR DRUG TESTING, DISEASE MODELING, AND THERAPEUTIC USE
Jennifer A. Lewis
Harvard University, USA
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My talk will describe our recent efforts to generate vascularized organoids in vitro that exhibit enhanced maturation and function for both drug testing and disease modeling. Next, I will describe the scalable generation of vascularized organ-specific tissues for therapeutic use via sacrificial writing in functional tissue (SWIFT). Though broadly applicable, I will highlight our recent work on engineering human kidney tissues.



ORGANIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS
Bin Liu
National University of Singapore, SINGAPORE
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Organic electronic materials play important roles in modern electronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and transistors. Upon interaction with light, these optically active materials can undergo different photophysical and photochemical pathways, providing unique opportunities for optimization of light emission via radiative decay, heat generation via nonradiative decay, and singlet oxygen production or phosphorescence emission via intersystem crossing, all of which open alternative opportunities for their applications in sensing, imaging, and therapy. In this talk, we discuss all the pathways that determine the optical properties of high-performance organic electronic materials, focusing on the optimization of each pathway for photogeneration and relaxation of electronic excited states. We further examine nanoparticle (NP) fabrication techniques tailored to macromolecules and small molecules to render them into NPs with optimized size and distribution for biomedical applications and endow organic electronic materials with water dispersibility and biocompatibility. Lastly, we illustrate the in vitro and in vivo applications of some representative organic electronic materials after optimization of each relaxation pathway.



NONINVASIVE PRENATAL AND CANCER DETECTION BY PLASMA DNA ANALYSIS: FROM DREAM TO REALITY
Yuk Ming "Dennis" Lo
Chinese University of Hong Kong, HONG KONG

MICROFLUIDIC TOTAL ANALYSIS SYSTEMS FOR THE SKIN
John A. Rogers
Northwestern University, USA
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Emerging classes of thin, soft microfluidic systems enable capture, storage and on-device chemical analysis of microliter volumes of eccrine sweat as it arrives at the surface of the skin. Several types of these skin-interfaced technologies have appeared in the recent literature, with applications in sports/fitness, health diagnostics and chemical exposure. This talk describes the key ideas and presents some of the most recent device examples.



Hot Topic Keynote Speakers

Artificial Intelligence in Microfluidics

VIRTUAL STAINING OF LABEL-FREE TISSUE USING DEEP LEARNING
Aydogan Ozcan
University of California, Los Angeles, USA

TOWARD PETABYTE-SCALE OPTOFLUIDIC IMAGING CYTOMETRY
Kevin Tsia
University of Hong Kong, HONG KONG

Energy and Environment

David A. Weitz
Harvard University, USA

Chuck Henry
Colorado State University, USA

Organ-on-a-Chip

Dongeun (Dan) Huh
University of Pennsylvania, USA

Roger D. Kamm
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wearables and Continuous Sensing

Ali Javey
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Firat Güder
Imperial College London, UK